Posts Tagged ‘stress’

Tips for Moving: A Retrospect

25/10/2018

dachshund moving boxes

Moving is no joke. It’s rarelyย never easy. Yet, since my fella and I moved to the U.S. back in 2013, we have been moving on a nearly annual basis. Each time we had our reasons but that’s not to say I enjoy it. But, over the course of August and September, as we packed up, hiked bags of donation items to HousingWorks, and awkwardly weaved through busy Manhattan streets carrying stacks of moving boxes from Home Depot, I realized that I’ve learned a few things about moving. Both the upsides of moving and few ways to cope.

One of the upsides of moving is the opportunity to minimize and consider what you actually need. Even with our frequent moving habits, it always amazes me just how much “stuff” we accumulate in the span of a year. I tend to think I’m pretty thoughtful about what I buy or acquire. Do I really need that extra sweater? Is there room for another cute coffee mug? Yes, these are small items but multiply this by say, 20, and you actually have quite a bit of extra stuff on your hands. That’s not to say you should never acquire anything new or treat yourself, but it’s worth considering. Over the years I’ve tried to adopt the mentality that if I pick up a new piece of clothing, for example, then something has to go. One in, one out. This helps and whenever you do need to move (or just undertake a good spring cleaning), it’ll make the task that much easier. I mean, it’s still a pain but the payoff is extra space along with the light feeling that you only have what you need and what’s important to you.

With that said, and even with the excitement of change ahead, moving can be incredibly overwhelming. Before diving in, I give the disclaimer that I’m far from perfect (GASP!) and I’ll admit that some of these tips come from a place of retrospect. That’s life though, isn’t it? We tend to learn from our mistakes but I suppose the willingness to learn is better than nothing at all.

  • Space out packing.ย This really only applies if you have at least a month to move and may not work if you have only a week to pack up and get out. Rather than try and finish your packing in a few days, tackle it by room. If you have a big space like a living room, then take an extra day or two to finish packing that space. I found that spending a few hours packing and purging items from one room then stopping for the day was a boon to my sanity. Sure, one could wake up early to start packing and go like a marathon runner until late into the night. It’s a short timeframe of pain but for someone like me, it would also take me a great deal of time to recover, not great for mental health. So, if you get easily overwhelmed by big tasks like this, then try to approach this part of the process one room, one box at a time. I also like to give myself extra time because, without fail, I always get sidetracked by photos (one below that made me smile) or some long lost sentimental items. And, personally, I think taking time to appreciate these pieces of our history and life is important. Nourishing your soul is always time well-spent.

    funny family photo

  • Take time to rest. Spacing out packing means there’s time to rest and take care of personal needs (and you know, do some work. In my case, thank goodness for the remote work life!) Rest is so, so important – especially during these hectic times. It may feel entirely counterintuitive because you have SO MUCH TO DO but I’m telling you, pushing through the work just because you feel you should can be really counterproductive. We’ve all heard this and it applies to life, in general. Allowing yourself time for a nap, a nice walk, or whatever recharges your batteries will actually help your productivity more than soldiering through. Be honest with yourself. You can take at least 15 minutes to lay down, do a round of sun salutations, or sit with your eyes closed (trick yourself into meditating).
  • Eat well and stay hydrated.ย I really don’t care to admit how much pizza my fella and I ate during our moving months. Look, I love pizza. Who doesn’t? But I definitely hit a pizza wall, which sounds way more delicious than it actually is. Ordering takeaway or eating out kind of comes with the territory of moving since all of your cooking utensils are packed away and you’re typically not adding fresh groceries to the fridge. So, instead of gravitating towards the greasiest thing on offer, order a salad and/or pick up some fruit to have around as a snack. There are plenty of things we can eat that aren’t terrible for us that are quick and also easy to have on hand. And water. Drink all the water. Again, the stress of moving makes it entirely too easy to pop open a bottle of wine while you’re packing and this can make the process much more tolerable but limit the alcohol.
  • Or, just eat. Contrary to what I just said, stress and anxiety can actually make you lose your appetite. In which case, just eat. Eat until you hit the pizza wall. I also really like smoothies when my appetite needs a kick start. They’re easy to take in and they provide nourishment for the body. And, the rule for water still applies. Obviously, I’m not providing nutritional advice here. I just want you to eat.
  • Find levity. For me, this came from my own dogs (see photo at top) and in the form of looking at funny dogs on Instagram. I will forever be grateful to this little lady in Germany for helping me through the stress of moving. (@madame_eyebrows if you’re on Instagram). Yes, that’s right. The saddest dog on the internet made me super happy. But c’mon, look at that face! Look at those eyebrows! My point is find your own source of levity.

@madame_eyebrows on Instagram

These tips are provided in the context of moving, but they really apply to any stressful period during your life. A work project, planning an event, or whatever big task you have on your plate. Self-care is always worth the time and you’ll come out on the other side much healthier.

Advertisements